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Tasks

Priorities - A: high, B: medium, C: low; Status - _: unfinished, X: finished, C: cancelled, P: pending, o: in progress, >: delegated. Covey quadrants - Q1 & Q3: urgent, Q1 & Q2: important
BCMeet jeromesan880 @1700 at the Figaro near Dela rosa and Leviste and Valero (2005.06.22 finance)
AXCall Canadian embassy and follow up application (2005.06.22 MoveToCanada)
BXWrite an example tag processor that deals with indents : E-Mail from Allen Halsey (2005.06.22 planner)
BXRefer Maoi's brother to Charo for black-and-white and portrait photography as a hobby (lovecat)
BXFigure out how to automatically fix tasks while still getting planner-id to work : E-Mail from Romain Francoise (2005.06.22 planner)

Notes

1. Think Rich, Pinoy

Larry Gamboa

Seems to be a rehash of Robert Kiyosaki's Rich Dad, Poor Dad, padded out with anecdotes of personal success at real estate thanks to a mentor who is named and praised effusively throughout the book. It feels more like a "this is the magic formula" book than a level-headed look at finances. I wouldn't buy it or recommend it to others.

2. Love & Money: A Life Guide for Financial Success

Jeff Opdyke

I browsed through this book on a whim and ended up reading it cover to cover. This John Wiley book is a great read if you're looking for sound advice on finances and relationships. Here's the book blurb from the publisher's site:

Reviews: "The financial decisions we make in our lives are sometimes not the easiest to discuss but have long-lasting effects. [Opdyke’s advice] has opened the door in my relationship to conversations that were a long time coming." - Josh, regular reader of Opdyke’s "Love & Money" column, Florida

Real answers to real questions about money and relationships:

  • I have too much debt and my credit isn’t very good. How can I fix my financial problems? And how do I break the news to my boyfriend?
  • How do I teach my kids the value of money, when my parents shower them with expensive gifts?
  • My wife makes more money than I do, does that give her a greater voice in our financial decisions? Are we still equal?
  • How much should I give my child in allowance? And will it really help him learn the value of a dollar?
  • We want to have our first baby, but we don’t know if we can afford it yet. How much money do we really need to have in the bank?

If you’re like most people, you’re struggling with questions like these. Whether we like it or not, money makes a big difference in the choices we make and the lives we lead. Unresolved questions about money can put unwanted stress on even the healthiest relationships–between spouses, between parents and children, and even between friends. In Love & Money, columnist Jeff Opdyke offers practical personal finance advice, as well as strategies for dealing with touchy financial topics–so that money doesn’t end up costing you something even more valuable.

Random notes:

Formative

  • Most people are terrified of budgets because they think of them as strict limits. Use a spending plan instead, and remember that you're giving up that latte for something specific like a car.
  • Debt affects relationships and self-esteem. Tell your significant other if you have a debt burden so that it's out in the open.
  • Little things add up. Be conscious.
  • Mix savings with investments. Find an emergency buffer level both of you are comfortable with.

Building a life together

  • Discuss finances as a couple.
  • Keep a joint account instead of his-and-hers.
  • Resist temptation to hide your expenses.
  • Keep your relationship as equals even if one person earns significantly more than the other. Recognize the value contributed by a stay-at-home spouse. Don't let your money substitute for your time or effort around the house.

Kids

  • Consider finances when thinking about having a child. Will you be able to provide good opportunities without depriving your children?
  • Be careful about toys. Teach kids that material things != happiness instead of indulging them all the time.
  • Allowances can help your children learn how to manage money. Don't have any big expectations like making them learn how to donate to charity or save for college. Resist the temptation to supplement this through your generosity. Make it regular, not dependent on their behavior: that way, they don't see money as the reward.
  • Think about the messages you send kids. When they want something, do you tell them you can't afford it--and then turn around and get yourself something?
  • Plan for education Really Early.

Middle years

  • One income or two?
  • Relocating because of a career is very difficult. Is the traveling spouse willing to give up that dream if necessary? Is the trailing spouse willing to walk away from his or her own career if necessary? Try to find a win-win. Acknowledge difficulties, particularly for trailing spouse.
  • People have different vacation needs. Find a good compromise. (It's vacation, after all.) Might not even be together all the time.
  • Talk about your life goals. Check for compatibility. Find good compromises.

Retirement

  • Plan for retirement really early.
  • Medical aid is expensive. Think about that, too.
  • Should you support your parents? Should your children support you when you're old? Book: Parents should have planned ahead for their own retirement, so should not oblige children as their children's primary responsibility is to their new family. (For us Filipinos, though, this is practically a given...)

彼女には2人の兄弟がいて、コンピューター業界で働いている。 She has two brothers, who work in the computer industry.

UPDATE: Clair wrote:

I have been browsing through Logsense (http://www.logsense.com) — that blog also some various tips that are helpful :) Thanks for sharing your notes. Finance - that is something I am horrible at. The game last Saturday just made me realize how clueless I am. I ought to get a grip on myself. Am not getting any younger. And I ought to think of the future, not just the now! Thing is that with things overwhelming me now, I forget about things for the future.

コンピューター産業の発展は非常に急速である。 The development of the computer industry has been very rapid.

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3. Driving lessons: 1st hour — 2005.06.20

Categories: None — Permalink

P: Pass, NI: Needs Improvement, F: Fail

1. IDENTIFICATION OF BLOWFATCH(tm) P
2. PRE-START ROUTINE .
Are all doors properly closed? P
Is your driving seat in the right position? P
Are the clean and properly adjusted? P
Have you and your passengers put on seat belts? P
3. IDENTIFICATION AND PROPER USE OF CONTROLS NEAR THE STEERING WHEEL .
turn signals P
wiper & washer P
window controls P
hazard P
horn P
4. HANDLING OF STEERING WHEEL .
proper handling (10:10 position) P
turning of steering wheel NI
5. IDENTIFICATION AND USES OF PEDALS .
clutch P
brake P
gas P
6. DIAGRAM ON GEAR SHIFTING LEVER AND ITS USES P
7. STARTING AND STOPPING PROCEDURES .
proper stepping on and controlling of pedals NI
footwork and working level of clutch NI
8. PROPER WAY OF SHIFTING GEARS P
9. OBSERVING SAFE DISTANCES .
safe following distance P
safe stopping distance P
10. LEFT AND RIGHT TURNING .
observing TLSL before turning NI
11. INSTRUMENTAL PANEL BOARD .
indicator lights P
gauges P

Remarks: FOCUS IN CONTROLLING OF PEDALS AND TURNING OF YOUR STEERING WHEEL. MORE RELAX!

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私はパソコンを修理してもらいました。 I had my personal computer repaired.

4. Driving lessons: 2nd hour — 2005.06.21

Categories: None — Permalink
1. REVIEW THE FOLLOWING .
PRE-START ROUTINE P
proper handling of steering wheel P
shifting of gears P
starting and stopping procedures P
left and right turning P
safe distances P
2. STRAIGHT DRIVING P
3. RESPONDING TO TRAFFIC CONTROL SIGNALS .
traffic lights P
pedestrian lights P
traffic officer's signals P
4. FOLLOWING ROADWAY SIGNS AND PAVEMENT MARKINGS P
5. TURNING TO THE CORRECT LANE AT AN INTERSECTION P

好むと好まざるとにかかわらず、コンピュータが、われわれの生活の中で重要な役割を果たしていることは確かである。 Computers are certainly playing an important role in our life, whether we like it or not.

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5. Driving lessons: 3rd hour — 2005.06.21

Categories: None — Permalink
1. PRE-START ROUTINE P
2. REVIEW THE FOLLOWING: .
starting and stopping procedures P
shifting gears P
safe distances P
3. BACKING PROCEDURES P
4. PARKING PROCEDURES .
entering and leaving perpendicular, diagonal and parallel parking spaces P

Remarks: PRACTICE.

(Uh oh. I know how to park now...)

データは、メインコンピューターから自分のものに転送できるし、またその逆もできる。 Data can be transmitted from the main computer to yours, and vice versa.

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6. Good presentation tips

Categories: None — Permalink

Five Rules for Better PowerPoint Presentations (from Working Smart) is a great post on presentation skills. Here are his five rules.

  • Rule #1: Don’t give PowerPoint center stage.
  • Rule #2: Create a logical flow to your presentation. Better yet, tell a story.
  • Rule #3: Make your presentation readable.
  • Rule #4: Remember, less is more.
  • Rule #5: Distribute a handout.

According to my students, my most memorable presentation was the one I did on computer history.

Right. Computer history.

I had one thought per slide. One line. Sometimes not even a line, just a picture.

The pictures were visual aids for the story I told about operating systems. I couldn't stand the bullet lists that all the other teachers were using, so I made something very sparse but fun.

One of my students said it felt like a TV ad. <laugh>

Slides are a tool, not a crutch.

Working Smart - My Favorite Powerpoint Resources is a treasure-trove of links on presentation skills. Here are some nifty ones from that list:

UPDATE: Clair wrote:

*laugh!* Unix humor ;) But it is true. Gah! I hate presentations that rely on the dratted slides... I avoid doing that as well. But I still haven't gotten the hang of it. However, stories are something i enjoy telling and listening to. HMmmm. I guess that is why I enjoyed my archival science electives! :) My prof used to tell stories more often than lectures. I seem to absorb more that way. My classmates don't get it though. But that style works for me. Hmmmm. When I do get to teach, I will remember this! ;)

今日この番組でハッカーの問題をクローズアップするんだって。 This program is going to focus on computer hacking issues today.

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7. Information Design

Categories: information#1Permalink

While reading about presentation skills, I stumbled across a page entitled "So where are all the Information Designers?". I found a name for what I'm interested in! Information design is what I do with wikis. I should learn more about this.

UPDATE: Clair wrote:

I have seen some courses aside from the one you showed me. :) It looks very interesting. Very similar to what librarians do! *laugh* I really must take a break and re-assess my life.

冗談を言うほど賢いコンピューターがありえるだろうか。 Can there be a computer intelligent enough to tell a joke?

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8. Geeks and soft stuff

Categories: None — Permalink

Kathy Sierra (Creating Passionate Users) was surprised to find that geeks are very interested in learning about "soft" topics like community.

I'm _crazy_ about my community of passionate users and co-developers. The personal information manager I maintain gives me so many opportunities to tailor it to fit people's individual quirks. I love getting things to fit people. It's about people, not code. I love helping people become more productive. Dominique says I'm wired differently. He hasn't met a lot of maintainer-types; most open source developers he's met are just happy to get something out there. Me, I get my kick out of the relationship I build with the other people throughout the years. I get my kick out of making people's lives easier. I don't write extremely clever code, but I learn so much from them about the ways people plan!

I'm also crazy about organizing information and collecting knowledge. "So where are all the Information Designers?" gave me a name for my interest in wikis and developing a culture of documentation in communities. Again, it's about people! =) Sure, I have to know the technology to set up a good wiki and customize it to their needs, but I'm really more focused on the process and the culture.

Is it ungeeky to be interested in these things, to devour business and psychology books even more avidly than I do technical books? I don't think so. To me, people and organizations have even more complex and fascinating systems that I want to hack. They're way, way, way cool. I've come a long way since my "eewww, MIS!" days, and I look forward to learning more about the way people work.

ジョーンズ先生はコンピュータを教えています。 Mrs. Jones is teaching computer science.

UPDATE: I'm not the only one! J. Alejandro Noli said: "Wow Sacha, I completely understand that point and let me tell you: I'm with you!"

UPDATE: Clair wrote:

I think that geeks would be more or less interested in communities because geeks like being in communities *laugh* That is purely my opinion though. But if you will observe the people into FOSS, we are all interacting on a regular basis, sharing tips and new developments or code. And if you think about it, if not for the community of geeks, where would be FOSS now? ;) Maybe geeks aren't the typical sociable people but geeks seem to enjoy going together as groups :) I guess it's because geeks tend to have a certain focus on things we like in common but I suppose that not all geeks are out and out very sociable. But the sense of community is definitely there. (But as I already mentioned earlier, this is purely my opinion, based on my experiences.)

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9. The apple doesn't fall far from the tree

Categories: None — Permalink

A story from Charo:

Some years back, a grad of DLSU was still learning the ropes in photography. In the process he meets up with Jo Avila. At one point in time, over a couple of beers or so, the grad brings up this location near his school. "It must have been one hell of an expensive club! Better than Pegasus I guess! There were so many pretty girls going in and out of this place and there were lots of really great expensive cars!"

Jo goes, "Where is this place again?" Grad tells the exact location. Jo laughs.

Jo then tells me "Turns out that the guy was talking about John Chua's studio! The girls were the models. The cars... well, you know what they're for now."

Chat with :rcdiugun on testing.bitlbee.org%23bitlbee

現代は情報の時代で、私たちの日常生活でコンピューターが果たす役割はますます大きくなっている。 This is the age of information, and computers are playing an increasingly important role in our everyday life.

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I'd love to hear about any questions, comments, suggestions or links that you might have. Your comments will not be posted on this website immediately, but will be e-mailed to me first. You can use this form to get in touch with me, or e-mail me at sacha@sachachua.com .

Page: 2005.06.22
Updated: 2005-12-1615:15:0815:15:08-0500
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